The Clay Sanskrit Library Plays

The Clay Sanskrit Library  Plays
Author : Clay Sanskrit Library
Publisher : NYU Press
Total Pages : 1500
Release : 2009-11-09
ISBN 10 : 0814717489
ISBN 13 : 9780814717486
Language : EN, FR, DE, ES & NL

This set of plays provides an array of Sanskrit drama and satire, with plots that vary from the “strikingly Shakespearian” (as H. H. Wilson described it ) “Little Clay Cart” to a dramatization of and amendment to the “Ramáyana” in “Rama’s Last Act.” In addition to its scope of genre, the set covers a large period of time (the “Three Satires” by Bhállata, Ksheméndra, and Nila·kan alone were written over a period of nearly a thousand years) and also includes several works traditionally given less modern attention, such as “Málavika and Agni·mitra” by Kali·dasa, in order to provide a multifaceted view of Sankskrit theater. Included in this set: “The Lady of the Jewel Necklace” & “The Lady who Shows her Love” By Harsha. Translated by Wendy Doniger. 514 pages / 978-0-8147-1996-1 Little Clay Cart By Shúdraka. Translated by Diwakar Acharya. Foreword by Partha Chatterjee. 640 pages / 978-0-8147-0729-6 Málavika and Agni·mitra Kali·dasa. Translated by Dániel Balogh and Eszter Somogyi. 350 pages / 978-0-8147-8702-1 Rákshasa’s Ring By Vishákha·datta. Translated by Michael Coulson 385 pages / 978-0-8147-1661-8 Rama Beyond Price By Murári. Edited and translated by Judit Törzsök. 638 pages / 978-0-8147-8295-8 Rama’s Last Act By Bhava·bhuti. Translated by Sheldon Pollock. Foreword by Girish Karnad. 458 pages / 978-0-8147-6733-7 The Recognition of Shakúntala (Kashmir Recension) By Kali·dasa. Edited and translated by Somadeva Vasudeva. 419 pages / 978-0-8147-8815-8 Three Satires By Bhállata, Ksheméndra, and Nila·kantha. Edited and translated by Somadeva Vasudeva. 403 pages / 978-0-8147-8814-1


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